Objectives

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to…

·Identify and explain what life was like in segregated Washington during the early part of the 20th century by wrestling with contradictions in the nation’s capital, including the segregated dedication ceremony for the Lincoln Memorial and Marian Anderson’s performance there seventeen years later, in order to develop historical context and corroberate primary and secondary sources through analysis.

Standards

Resources

[Here, you should include a list of primary and secondary sources as well as other materials you will be using in the class. Attach all handouts and readings you will use for this lesson to the curricular unit.]

Warm Up

As students arrive to class, have the following prompt written on the board:

Based on the sources uncovered yesterday, how do you think the Mall could be used as a place to express ideas about issues in the nation?

Discuss student responses by calling on volunteers to

New Material

This activity asks students to source and corroborate a set of primary source documents related to segregation in DC.  Part 1 asks students to evaluate whether the source provides sufficient evidence to demonstrate the state of segregation in the whole capital. To answer this question, students must source the documents to determine whether the author represents all Washingtonian experiences.  Part 2 asks students to evaluate how additional documents would corroborate in order to describe Washington during segregation.

Practice

For group and paired practice, you may group students hetero- or homogeneously depending on the make up of your students and their practice with cooperative learning.

This lesson assumes a basic understanding of segregation and focuses on how these racial injustices took form on the National Mall, specifically. 

1. Analyzing the Sources:

  1. Divde the students into groups of 4.
  2. Distribute sources analysis sheet and a set of sources to each group.
  3. Allow students 30 minutes to collect information from the sources and record their findings in the provided handout.
  • Part 1 asks students to evaluate whether the source provides sufficient evidence to demonstrate the state of segregation in the whole capital. To answer this question, students must source the documents to determine whether the author represents all Washingtonian experiences.  
  • Part 2 asks students to evaluate how additional documents would corroborate in order to describe Washington during segregation.
  1. Periodically check in with students:
Call on volunteers to:
  1. Describe how segregation and discrimination limited opportunities for African Americans.
  2. Describe disturbances resulting from racial tensions.
  3. Explain how African American leaders resisted discrimination.

Duscuss challenges the students are finding with the sources, and ways they are overcoming these chalenges:

  1. the complexity of historical causes and effects, including the limitations on determining cause and effect.
  2. interpreting past events and issues within the context in which an event unfolded rather than present-day norms and values.
  3. understanding the meaning, implication, and impact of historical events and recognizing that events could have taken other directions.
  4. dentifying bias and prejudice in historical interpretations.

Assessment

Students will create either a poem, song, or drawing to depict what life was like in Washington, DC during the early 20th century.

·Use primary sources examined in class to support your response.

·Cite your sources. Include the bibliographical information in a Works Cited.

Closure and Reflection

Exit Ticket: Students will use this lesson to develop the skills they will need to apply independently in order to research and evaluate the ways the Mall can be used today for their final assessment.

Post the following on the board:

List 3 things you learned about segregation and the Mall today.

List 2 ways you might use the Mall to fight against injustice.

List 1 question you want to learn more about.

Explain.