Curricular Unit Information

Unit Title: Civil Rights, Vietnam, and the Ordeal of Liberalism
Course: APUSH
Grade Level: 11
Unit Length: [7]
Length of Class Period: 45-55 minutes

Common Core Standards (connections):

RH 11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecxting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole. 

RH 11-12.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

RH 11-12.7 Intergrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem

WHST 11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.  

WHST 11-12.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing o addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

WHST 11-12.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem, narrow or broaden the subject, demonstrating, understanding of the subject under investigation.

WHST 11-9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, refletion, and research

WHST 11-12.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Personal Stake:

As a member of a minority group, I have experienced the pain of being on the outside. While I don't wear my identity in quite the same fashion as my students, I have been beaten, hung in effigy, and had a cross burned on my front lawn. All on the same day when I was 17. It is essential for students to have a better understanding of what happened in the past so that they can have an idea of how to navigate the future. Furthermore, it is important to acknowledge the past so that they can have some hope that a brighter day is ahead. As a country we have been able to move forward so quickly is  because once we recognize a mistake, we try to fix it. While it seems that the problems of the past still exist, it is evident that the bar has moved for the better.  It is my goal to teach the idea of virtuous citizenry to my students, and this is the first step in being an active and productive member of American society. 


Unit Topic:

Because students do not seem to make any connections between the introduction of slavery in 1609 in the American colonies and any Civil Rights issues in modern times, we will begin the year with a discussion about the Civil Rights Movement. Students need to be made aware of both the Long Civil Rights Movement and of the Short Civil Rights Movement. 

The class will emphasize the ideas that places hold not only a power of memory and existential angst (i.e. The Vietnam Memorial, The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, The Freedom Tower Memorial (9/11) for example, but a real power over people’s everyday lives. In terms of civil rights, places often convey customs that are difficult if not impossible to overcome in the short term, infringe on economic and educational opportunities, not to mention a host of other possibilities denied. 

Over the summer students were required to read Anne Moody’s Coming of Age in Mississippi and write a synopsis of each of the four (4) sections (Childhood, High School, College, and The Movement).

Using Moody’s book as a lens to view the effect of the Civil Rights Movement on an individual’s life,the unit will branch out to events that occurred during the period that affected and impacted the communities and body politic of America. Since the book ends earlier than the Unit, we will refer back to incidents that were discussed in the text and what connections exist. Students will develop analytical skills by working with both primary and secondary sources (including textbooks, speeches, etc.) and images. 

Methods of Inquiry:

Students began this Unit over the summer by reading Anne Moody’s Coming of Age in Mississippi and writing a synopsis for each of the four (4) sections: Childhood, High School, College, and The Movement. The culminating project will be a review of the book with a slant towards how Moody’s personal experiences mirrored the national Civil Rights Movement and discuss the changes that occurred on both a micro and macro scale over the course of time in the United States. 

Students will also be analyzing/annotating speeches, documents, and political cartoons and using them to write short essays as well as viewing various videos online and in the classroom and writing analytical style essays and sourcing (essentially explaining who wrote the piece, who the audience was, the place and time, how it was received by different groups or the targeted audience, how it fits into the context of its time and place, and perhaps, how we can make sense of it in relationship to other primary--and secondary--sources) documents.

Perhaps the most important skill students will be working on is using their reseach, both in their textbooks and outside sources, to develop a narrative to connect the various "events" that we will be concentrating on. Students will be assigned a specific event and will be responsable for explaining the causation and impact of other events that led to the specific action they will be leading a discussion about.  

Attitudes:

This unit is designed to assist students in empathizing with people trapped in a time and place that did not seem to offer any hope of advancement. It should also leave an impression as to the difficulty in overcoming decades of poverty, racism-both cultural and systemic-that existed not only in the South, but in the entire country.


Assessment of Student Learning: 

Students began this Unit over the summer by reading Anne Moody’s Coming of Age in Mississippi and writing a synopsis for each of the four (4) sections: Childhood, High School, College, and The Movement. The culminating project will be a review of the book with a slant towards how Moody’s personal experiences mirrored the national Civil Rights Movement and discuss the changes that occurred on both a micro and macro scale over the course of time in the United States. 

Students will also be analyzing/annotating speeches, documents, and political cartoons and using them to write short essays as well as viewing various videos online and in the classroom. In addition, class participation, notebook checks, and Essential Questions submitted by students will be included.

Apart from the book review based on one section from the Anne Moody's Coming of Age in Mississippi based on the power that the place in that time in her life had on her and others, the final assessment will include a twelve (12) question, timed (7 minute) APUSH multiple-choice quiz and an additional paper based on “Black and White and Married in the Deep South: A Shifting Image,” (Susan Saulny Published: New York Times, March 19, 2011) that will focus on social changes in the South over time.

Diagnostic Assessment:

Students will be show their prior knowledge of the Civil Rights Movement and Era through the four (4) essays they wrote over the summer (each student was required to write a synopsis of the four sections of the text--Childhood, High School, College, and The Movement) and leading discussions about Anne Moody’s Coming of Age in Mississippi in class.

In addition, students will be writing an opening day short essay (between 3-5 paragraphs) dealing with the idea of the power of a place on the lives of individuals after viewing and discussing a photo of a sharecropper’s shack in class. 

Formative Assessment:

At the conclusion of each class, students will be asked to fill out an exit ticket. One requirement will be twofold: 

  1. What was the most important/interesting thing we discussed in class today and why?
  2. Formulate an essential question for tomorrow based on what we studied today.

Summative Assessment:

At the conclusion of the unit, students will take a multiple-choice APUSH quiz.

In addition, students will begin working on a review of the Anne Moody book with a slant towards how Moody’s personal experiences mirrored the national Civil Rights Movement and discuss the changes that occurred on both a micro and macro scale over the course of time in the United States. This will allow students the opportunity to express their own thoughts and to use both resources that have been presented to them and those resources that they find on their own. This paper will be peer reviewed and then submitted for a final grade.

As a year long project, students will be looking at the key issues raised in the section that is being discussed and come up with ideas to further social justice both locally and nationally. At the end of each Advisory students will have chosen on topic we have discussed, and research what has been done about the issue and make a suggestion as to what else should or could be done. These projects will include a public/class presentation that will vary in form from exhibit style, PowerPoint, to performance (poetry, music, etc.). 

Differentiation:

Each lesson will contain primary and secondary reading sources, class discussion, music, and visuals to promote all aspects of students’ preferred methods of study. On many occasion there will be short lectures that will allow students the opportunity to practice both listening and note taking skills. 

Each day students will be asked to lead sections of the class, sometimes they will be given the opportunity to formally prepare a short lesson, and informally they will simply be placed on the spot to present questions for discussion. 

Because the AP US History course is writing dependent, there will be many opportunities for students to write both class (or informal) essays, AP based short essays, and longer form DBQs (both will be timed and will be assigned in class and for homework). In almost all cases, students will peer-review their writing assignments and credit for doing so. 

Community and Cultural Resources:

While APUSH is not a locally based course, there are many community resources available to students. They include Fords Theatre, Lincoln’s Cottage, the Fredrick Douglas house, Tudor Place, the Mall, federal buildings, museums, and oral histories of their families and friends. 

DC was in many ways a very active participant in the fight for equality, both in education and social welfare, a fight that continues to this day and there are many local businesses that have roots back to the 1950s in the neighborhood. For extra-credit students will be presented with the opportunity to do additional work. 

Daily Instruction:

Daily Instruction:

Lesson #1: America as it should be? And what power does place have in our lives?

  •  
    • Students will view a KeyNote that depicts various American scenes.
    • They will be asked to write down as many of them as they can.
    • Students will then get into small groups, compare lists, and then decide/discuss which of these places feels most American to them and why. 
    • Class will regroup and a discussion will follow. 
    • Finally, a picture of a sharecropper’s shack will be put up on the board. 
      • Question: Is this an America you think of?
      • How could this place impact the lives of those who live there? Consider living conditions, economics, educational and civil rights opportunities, etc.
  • If time permits, the discussion will continue. Students will be required to write a short three to five (3-5) paragraph essay on the power of this place on the individuals who live there. 

Lesson #2: Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi, Section 1: “Childhood

  • Student led discussion about the life of Anne Moody. As the discussion progresses, we will look at other events that were occurring during that time:
    1. 1941: March on Washington
    2. 1942: Double V campaign
    3. 1943: Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)
    4. 1947: To Secure These Rights
  •  
    • Jackie Robinson
    • Mendez v. Westminster School District
  • 1948: State’s Rights Democratic Party (Dixiecrats)

Lesson #3: Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi, Section 2: “High School

  • Student led discussion about the life of Anne Moody. As the discussion progresses, we will look at other events that were occurring during that time:
    1. 1954: Brown v. Topeka Board of Education
    2. 1956: Emmett Till murdered (August)
    3. 1956: “Southern Manifesto”

Lesson #4: Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi, Section 3: “College

  • Student led discussion about the life of Anne Moody. As the discussion progresses, we will look at other events that were occurring during that time:
    1. 1957: Little Rock High School
  • Southern Christian Leadership Council (SCLC)

Lesson #5: Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi, Section 4: “The Movement

  • Student led discussion about the life of Anne Moody. As the discussion progresses, we will look at other events that were occurring during that time:
    1. 1960: Greensboro, NC sit-ins (February)
    2. 1961: Kennedy inauguration speech
      • Freedom Rides (May)
    3. 1963: Bus Boycott, Birmingham, AL

Lesson #6: Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi, Section 4: “The Movement” 

Continued.

Continue the student led discussion about the life of Anne Moody. As the discussion progresses, we will look at other events that were occurring during that time:

  •  
    1. 1963: March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (August)
      • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “I Have a Dream” speech
  •  
    1. 1964: Civil Rights Act of 1964
  • Freedom Summer

Lesson #7: The Beginning of Political Change and the Road to the Great Society

Teacher led discussion.

  •  
    1. 1963: Kennedy Assassination
      • President Lyndon Baines Johnson and the Great Society
  •  
    1. 1964: Freedom Summer
      • Civil Rights Act of 1964
  • Freedom Summer
  1. 1965: Malcolm X assassinated
    • Autobiography of Malcolm Xis published
    • Congress passes Voting Rights Act of 1965
    • Antiwar activities begin on university campuses
  2. Assign sections to students to lead discussions for Lesson #8.

Lesson #8: The end of the Movement?   

      1. 1968: MLK assassination (April 4)
      • JFK assassination (June 4, 1968)
      • Fair Housing Act
      •  
        1. 1969: Young Lords founded
      • Occupation of Alcatraz (Native-American protest)
      •  
        1. 1972: National Black Political Convention

    “Trail of Broken Tears” protests