Curricular Unit Information

Retracing the footsteps of historical persons from our country’s past helps us observe the landscape, and better understand our heritage.

Visiting the actual sites and “Places of Power” where these historical figures lived and travelled, gives us the opportunity to reflect upon how these people contributed to the hope that the United States would become a country of hope, freedom and friendship.
When children are introduced to our country’s history and what it represent for Americans (then and now). This gives them a prerequisite for why many monuments/memorials etc... feature specific Americans.

In conclusion, the objective its to give the students access to landscape in the District of Columbia that will accent the fact that our country is “A Place of Power” founded by brave men, and women from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds who’s courage and bravery, fostered US independence.

Personal Stake:
Retracing the footsteps of historical persons from our country’s past helps us observe the landscape, and better understand our heritage. Visiting the actual sites and “Places of Power” where these historical figures lived and travelled, it  gives us the opportunity to reflect upon how these people contributed to the hope that the United States would become a country of hope, freedom and friendship. When children are introduced to our country’s history and what it represent for Americans (then and now). This will give them a prerequisite for why many monuments/memorials etc... feature specific Americans. In conclusion, the objective its to give the students access to landscape in the District of Columbia that will accent the fact that our country is “A Place of Power” founded by brave men, and women from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds who’s courage and bravery, fostered US independence.
Unit Topic:
The big idea the students will be exploring is how responsible leaders determine what civic values are and how they demonstrate those values.  The students will identify and describe the symbols, icons and traditions of the United States that exemplify cherished ideals and provide continuity and a sense of community across time. The students will utilize local maps, primary sources, informative books, non-fiction stories, biographies about the Fredrick Douglas and Abraham Lincoln and visit the homes of these historic figures in order to walk where they walked, explore the landscape and location where they lived and discuss why these locations are in fact “Places of Power”

DCPS Content and Skills Standards:

(Geography)
1.1- Students interpret maps, including the use of map elements to organize information about places and environment.
Locate cardinal directions (e.g., north, east, south, and west) and apply them to maps and globes.
 Plan a safe walking route from home to school
 Locate Washington, DC on a map

(Civic Values)
1.2 Students identify and describe, the symbols, icons, songs and traditions of the United States that exemplify cherished ideals and provide continuity and a sense of community across time.
State the meaning of US national symbols such as the American flag, bald eagle, White House and Statue of Liberty
4) Describe the meaning of words associated with civic values such as fairness, responsibility and rules.  
1.3 Students identify the current president of the United States, describe what presidents do, and explain that they are elected by the people

Common Core Standards (connections):
READING
RL.1.1 Ask and answer such questions about key details in a text.
RI.1.5 Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.
RI.1.7 Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.
RF.1.4   a) Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. b) Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings (Working towards
RF.1.4: Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.)

WRITING
W.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure. W.1.7: Participate in shared research and writing projects.

Methods of Inquiry:-

- Make Historical Observations symbols, images, artifacts and places
- Form Questions about civic values, symbols, images, artifacts, historical figures and places
- Analyze text, images, artifacts and places to gain historical meaning
- Make inferences from text, images, artifacts and places
- Research Books using “Lincoln and Douglas” as a theme

Attitudes:

Students should have a solid understanding of what civic values are, how they are demonstrated and what they represent. They should make connections between these meanings and how they can apply said meanings to different aspects of their lives starting at home, then to school and finally connecting them to their local neighborhood community. Students will be willing participants in exploring and learning about the various Historic leaders and compare and contrast them to Leaders in their community and within the country that represent these ideals.

Essential Questions:

-Why do we ask questions while we read?
-Are all children created equal?
-How would you describe a responsible citizen?
-What are your experiences with fairness (in our lives, in
  history)?
-How can you determine if a situation or circumstance is
  fair?
- What can we do to change an unfair situation?
- How do places in our community help us understand
  people in history who believed in fairness?

Assessment of Student Learning:
[For each category below, what indicators or evidence will demonstrate student learning; how do the assessments reflect the content, skills, and attitudes outlined above; how will you know what students do and don’t know at the beginning, middle, and end of the unit?]

Diagnostic Assessment:

I will use a multi-step approach to assessing my students both at the beginning and end of the unit.
Step 1: Students will create individual “KWL Charts” using different tools for each section so that I can collect prior knowledge, interest, questions and misconceptions around vocabulary i.e. community, equal, fair, responsible. These “KWL Charts” will be revisited at the end of the unit as a part of the summative assessment.  
Step 2: Students will complete a multiple choice pre-test which requires them to match pictures of Abraham Lincoln and Fredrick Douglas to items and historical places/landscapes that each man was connected with.

Formative Assessment:

See Lesson Plan

Summative Assessment:

Summative Assessment:
Step 1: Throughout the unit, students will be asking who, what, when, where, why, and how questions while they read and review various texts and collect evidence that helps them determine the meaning of civic values (fairness).  Using these question stems, students will conduct in class research using a variety of multi-level text and the internet to find answers.  Their research will also include recording and illustrating a variety of civic examples that demonstrate “fairness” discovered in and around their homes, their schools and their community. Each student will  have a field-studies entry in their Field  Journal every time they go on a trip.

Step 2:
Students will compare/contrast, analyze and interpret the meanings of civic values represented in different settings.
Student’s individual KWL Charts will be completed and show clear evidence about what Knew, Wanted to know and Learned.
Step 3:
Students will complete a multiple choice pre-test which requires them to match pictures of Abraham Lincoln and Fredrick Douglas to items and historical places/landscapes that each man was connected with.
Students will create a class nonfiction book with facts about each leader, the places and landscapes where they lived and visited and the “civic-values” they demonstrated.

Differentiation:

In order to address the many different academic levels and learning styles of my students the learning environments will incorporate Key Domains, i.e. Approaches To Learning, Social and Emotional Development, Creative Arts, and Health and Safety. Their interests will be supported using the following strategies.
- provide different leveled texts that address our topic of inquiry


-conduct in-depth analysis of whole group complex text that is approached using different learning styles: auditory (podcast or read aloud), tactile (manipulating words and sentences for further understanding, acting out the text, visiting a place/space that provides context for what is being read), intrapersonal (partners and small group work), interpersonal (independent reading and reflection), visual (images, charts, graphic organizers), etc.


-Cover text sequentially.

-Use PowerPoint™ presentations or overhead transparencies for visual learners when lecturing.

-Teach key concepts and generalizations unique to each topic or period.

-Examine various points of view.

-Use a variety of text, video, and taped material of varying degrees of difficulty.
-Contrast historical or abstract facts with current events to bring relevancy to students.

-Offer several options for projects so that each student can express his or her understanding in individual ways.


-Allow students options for assessment.

Community and Cultural Resources:[from the Summer Institute]
Lincoln’s Cottage; Fredrick Douglas’ House; Fort Stevens; Ford’s Theater; Tudor Place

Resources:
http://www.historyforkids.org/learn/northamerica/after1500/history/civilwar.htm
http://www.flagday.org/Pages/PatrioticSongs
http://library.thinkquest.org/CR0210627/
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/history/us/pres/lincoln/face.shtml
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/history/us/aframer/bioprintouts/douglass/
http://www.nps.gov/frdo/forteachers/index.htm
http://afroamcivilwar.org/education/programs.html
http://www.nps.gov/frdo/index.htm

K-2 Literature
The Bald Eagle by Lloyd G. Douglas: This book describes traits which make the eagle a good symbol for the United States, briefly explains how the eagle was chosen, and lists some of the places the symbol appears.

The Statue of Liberty by Lloyd G. Douglas: This book uses easy-to-read text to introduce the Statue of Liberty as an American symbol of freedom.

The White House by Lloyd G. Douglas: Through simple text and colorful photographs, this book introduces many interesting facts about America's most famous home.

Frederick Douglas: The Last Days of Slavery by William Miller: Named a Smithsonian magazine "Notable Children's Book" and a Hungry Mind Review "Children's Books of Distinction" Finalist, this inspiring story exemplifies how--as Douglass himself said--books and learning are "the pathway from slavery to freedom." A teacher activity guide is available to accompany this book. Full color.

A Picture Book Of Abraham Lincoln by David A. Adler: This biography follows the life of the popular president, from his childhood on the frontier to his assassination after the end of the Civil War.

Abe’s Lincoln’s Hat by Martha Brenner: Abraham Lincoln, one of our greatest presidents, started out in life as an absent-minded frontier lawyer. How did he nudge his memory? He stuck letters, court notes, contracts, and even his checkbook in his trademark top hat. When he took off his hat, it was all there!

Words Set Me Free: The Story of Young Frederick Douglass by Paula Wiseman: This picture book biography chronicles the youth of Frederick Douglass, one of the most prominent African American figures in American history. Douglass spent his life advocating for the equality of all, and it was through reading that he was able to stand up for himself and others. 

Image and Map  Resources:

Resources
Abraham Lincoln, U.S. President, looking at a photo album with his son, Tad Lincoln, Feb. 9, 1864] (LOC)
Crowd at Lincoln's second inauguration, March 4, 1865 (LOC)
Drummer Boy with the United States Colored Infantry. U.S. National Archives’ Local War and Conflict 139 Series Photographic Prints in John Taylor Album*, compiled ca. 1861 - ca. 1865
Anna Murray Douglass (FRDO 246) National Park Service
President Abraham Lincoln surveys the battlefield of Antietam Photo taken in September-October of 1862.
President Lincoln’s Cottage: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 Digital ID: (original digital file) highsm 10349 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/highsm.10349 Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-highsm-10349 (original digital file)
Frederick Douglas’ House: Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division under the digital ID hhh.dc0092.
Lincoln’s Letter to His Son’s Teacher:http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/archive/199702A21.html
 

Daily Instruction:
Provide a numbered list of lesson plan titles that correspond to the lesson plans that you create.