Objectives


(Day 3)

SWBAT:

  • List 3 events in American history that have negatively or positively affected the U.S. Capitol.
  • Identify economic, social or political activities that take place in and around the United States Capitol.

Standards

Link to Common Core Standards for History/Social Studies (Grades 6-8)

  • RH.6-8.1.
  • RH.6-8.2.
  • RH.6-8.7. 
  • RH.6-8.9.

Link to Common Core Standards for Writing (Grades 6-8)

  • WHST.6-8.1.
  • WHST.6-8.2.
  • WHST.6-8.4.
  • WHST.6-8.5.
  • WHST.6-8.7.
  • WHST.6-8.8.
  • WHST.6-8.9.

DCPS Social Studies Standards



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Resources

  • The History of the United States Capitol (YouTube video)

The History of the United States Capitol





Architect of the Capitol

Library of Congress Informational Text



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Washington Monument



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Folger Library



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Supreme Court



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US Capitol Informational Text



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Warm Up

Share with the class the three vintage advertisements

  • Quaker Wheat Berries Advertisement, c. 1900
  • Uneeda Biscuit Advertisement, c. 1900
  • Durham System Advertisement, c. 1925


Working cooperatively in small mixed ability groups, students will use the Library of Congress Primary Source Analysis Tool to analyze the advertisements.  Guiding questions for each section of the resouce are listed below

Observe

  1. What do you notice first?
  2. Find something small but interesting.
  3. What do you notice that you didn't expect?
  4. What do you notice that you can't explain?
  5. What do you notic that you didsee earlier?
Reflect
  1. Where do you think this came from?
  2. Why do you think somebody made this?
  3. What do you think was happening when this was made?
  4. Who was the audience?
  5. What tool was used to create this?
  6. Why is this item important?
  7. What can  you learn by examining this?

Question

  1. What do you wonder about...who?
  2. What do you wonder about...what?
  3. What do you wonder about...when?
  4. What do you wonder about...why?
  5. What do you wonder about...where?
  6. What do you wonder about...how?

Further Investigation: In the Further Investigation section, have students take a virtual tour of the Capitol and write a 1-sentence summary for each of the column headings on the Primary Source Analysis Tool (Observe, Refelct & Question)

Extension: On the back of thier Primary Source Analysis tool, students can conduct further investigation using the Architect of the Capitol virtual tour.

Library of Congress Primary Source Analysis Tool



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Quaker Wheat Berries Advertisement, c. 1900 Copyprint Warshaw Collection National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

Uneeda Biscuit Advertisement, c. 1900 Copyprint United States Senate Collection, Washington

Durham System Advertisement, c. 1925 Copyprint United States Senate Collection, Washington

New Material


Start the introduction to the New Material with The History of the United States Capitol video.

Notes for video/debrief questions

Physical Features

·What is the Capitol Building?

·When and why was a Congress House established in its current location?

·What, if anything is its central focus?

·What are its boundaries and what distinguishes it from adjacent areas?

·How and why have the size, shape, and image of the Capitol Building changed over the years?

·How and why have architectural styles varied or remained the same? Has the use to which various structures have been put changed significantly?

·What have been the important institutions in the Capitol, and what has been their role in the Capitol’s history?

Social Features

·Who has worked in Capitol Building? (famous or infamous)

·What groups (ethnic, religious, occupational, or social) and economic classes have been represented? In what proportions?

·What causes people to come to the Capitol?

·How and why events, activities, or problems brought residents to the Capitol, if at all?

·Have there been parties, festivals or parades, or other celebrations? If so, what has been their nature?

·Have disapproved activities been conducted in the neighborhood?

·Who have been the Capitol’s leading figures? Why did they acquire influence, and how did they use it?

·In what respects has the neighborhood thought of itself as different from the other building in Washington, D.C.? The nation? The world?

Kyvig, David E. Nearby History: Exploring the Past Around You, 2nd ed. Altamira Press, 2000.


Activity:

Divide students into groups and present each group with the challenges below. With the documents, distribute the captions and questions as shown. If some groups finish earlier than others, you may wish to add or subtract questions from the groups' assignments to create better balance in their workloads.

Group 1: What Has Happened In and Around the Capitol?
Task question: What do the following images of the Capitol have to do with important events in U.S. history? Answer any question(s) accompanying an image. In your presentation, make clear to the class how these photographs show the Capitol is an important building.

  • Mural in U.S. Capitol Building showing the burning of the Capitol in 1814. By Allyn Cox, 1974
    Why is the Capitol burning?
  • The Army of the Potomac Paraded Down Pennsylvania Avenue. By Matthew Brady, 1865
    Why are these Union soldiers parading in 1865?
  • Impeachment ballot recording votes of senators in the trial of Andrew Johnson, May 1868
    This is a tally for a vote that took place in the Senate in 1868. What was the vote about?
  • U.S. Capitol during blackout II. Horydczak, Theodor, ca. 1890-1971, photographer. March 1942,
    In this photo, taken after dark, there are no lights on in the Capitol building. Why would all the lights be turned off in an important building in 1942?
  • President's family leaves Capitol after ceremony.Shown are Caroline Kennedy, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, John F. Kennedy, Jr. (2nd row) Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, Patricia Kennedy Lawford (hidden) Jean Kennedy Smith (3rd Row) Peter Lawford. U.S. Capitol, East Front, Washington, D.C.
    What is the mood of the people shown in this photo? What do you think was happening at the Capitol when this picture was taken?

Group 2: What Happens in the U.S. Capitol?
Task question:Using your textbook as a secondary resource, find the qualifications, roles and functions of the Senate & House of Representatives.  (Hint: Use the US Constitution).  Explain to the class what goes on in the U.S. Capitol and what the following images have to do with the work that takes place there. In  your presentation make clear to the class how these photographs demonstrate that the Capitol is an important building.

  • Senate chamber in U.S. Capitol
  • House chamber in U.S. Capitol, remodeled
  • Foreign Relations Committee room in U.S. Capitol
  • Speaker's office in U.S. Capitol
  • President's office in the U.S. Capitol

Group 3: The U.S. Capitol and Inaugurations
Task question: What clues can you find in each of the images to indicate that a special event was taking place? What can you tell the class about the use of the Capitol for Presidential inaugurations? Use your US History textbook as a secondary resource to find the political party and years of service for each president. Show the class several of the following images of presidential inaugurations that took place at the Capitol and explain your findings. 

  • President Lincoln's inauguration, available on the Library of Congress
  • President Wilson, with top hat and speech in hand, delivering his inaugural address, March 5, 1917
  • President Franklin Delano Roosevelt delivering his inaugural address on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, January 20, 1941
  • Lyndon B. Johnson (left) being sworn in as President of the U.S. by Chief Justice Earl Warren (right) as Lady Bird Johnson and Hubert Humphrey (center) look on, January 20, 1965
  • Bill Clinton, standing between Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton, taking the oath of office of President of the U.S., January 20, 1993.
  • Barack Obama, standing with wife Michelle Obama and two daughters

Group 4: The U.S. Capitol and Its Neighbors
Task question: After reviewing the following images and reading the informational texts (found in resource section), SWBAT answer: What other important buildings are in the vicinity of the U.S. Capitol and tell a little bit about what happens in them. 

  • U.S. Capitol dome through columns of Supreme Court building
  • Dome of U.S. Capitol from Folger Library
  • U.S. Capitol from Washington Monument, with mask
  • View of the U.S. Capitol and beyond, showing the Mall and the Washington Monument
  • Dome of U.S. Capitol through window of Library of Congress.

Group 5: What's Inside the U.S. Capitol?
The U.S. Capitol is said to be one of the greatest museums of American art. Tell the class about some of the art objects found there. Visit The Capitol Project of American Studies at the University of Virginia, a link from the EDSITEment resource The Center for the Liberal Arts. Use the FIND function in the edit menu of your browser to find an art object from your state.

Show the class the following works of art, identify the subject, and explain why you think each object has been placed in the Capitol. (Note: This assignment offers a representative list of objects found in the Capitol. At The Capitol Project Index, there is an exhaustive list of objects in the Capitol with links to images of those objects. If desired, select objects that more closely match your curriculum.)


Mural in U.S. Capitol Building showing the burning of the Capitol in 1814. By Allyn Cox, 1974 Why is the Capitol burning?

The Army of the Potomac Paraded Down Pennsylvania Avenue. By Matthew Brady, 1865, available via a link from American Memory Why are these Union soldiers parading in 1865?

Impeachment ballot recording votes of senators in the trial of Andrew Johnson, May 1868, available on The Digital Classroom This is a tally for a vote that took place in the Senate in 1868. What was the vote about?

U.S. Capitol during blackout II. Horydczak, Theodor, ca. 1890-1971, photographer. March 1942, available on American Memory In this photo, taken after dark, there are no lights on in the Capitol building. Why would all the lights be turned off in an important building in 1942?

President's family leaves Capitol after ceremony., available on the JFK Library, a link from The Digital Classroom. Shown are Caroline Kennedy, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, John F. Kennedy, Jr. (2nd row) Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, Patricia Kennedy Lawford (hidden) Jean Kennedy Smith (3rd Row) Peter Lawford. U.S. Capitol, East Front, Washington, D.C. What is the mood of the people shown in this photo? What do you think was happening at the Capitol when this picture was taken?

House chamber in U.S. Capitol, remodeled

Senate chamber in U.S. Capitol

Foreign Relations Committee room in U.S. Capitol

President's office in U.S. Capitol

Speaker's (Speaker of the House of Representatives) office in U.S. Capitol

Barack Obama, standing with wife Michelle Obama and two daughters (Sasha & Malia)

Bill Clinton, standing between Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton, taking the oath of office of President of the U.S., January 20, 1993.

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt delivering his inaugural address on the east portico of the U.S. Capitol, January 20, 1941

President Lincoln's inauguration, available on the Library of Congress

Lyndon B. Johnson (left) being sworn in as President of the U.S. by Chief Justice Earl Warren (right) as Lady Bird Johnson and Hubert Humphrey (center) look on, January 20, 1965

President Wilson, with top hat and speech in hand, delivering his inaugural address, March 5, 1917

View of Dome from Folger LIbrary

View of Dome from Library of Congress

Dome through columns at Supreme Court Building

View of US Capitol and beyond

View of Dome from Washington Monument

Use the information provided to fill in the missing information. Draw a circle around the Washington Monument and write a capital "L" on the Folger Library.

Practice

See Activity section of New Material.  Students are working in mixed abilty cooperative groups to analyze primary sources.

Assessment

Students will be assessed on the accuracy and completion of their cooperative group assignments as well as thier group presentation. During the group presentation, students should address the learning objective:

  • Identify economic, social or political activities that take place in and around the United States Capitol.

During the group presentaton, students should distribute the images they analyzed, answer the questions for each and summarize any informational texts (if applicable). 

Teachers should use their class presentation rubric.  If one is not available, please visit this link.

Class discussion: Discuss what makes the Capitol an iconic American landmark. How or why is the US Capitol a national symbol? What has made it such an important building?

Exit slip: List 3 events in American history that have negatively or positively affected the structure, design or occupation of the U.S. Capitol.

Closure and Reflection

[The closure of a lesson should directly tie the new material, student practice, instructional objectives, and assessment together. It should also connect this lesson to the previous lesson and link to the next lesson(s). In this is space you can also include your notes about how the lesson went. You should indicate what worked well, what was problematic, ideas for modifying the lesson for future use, and how this particular lesson ties in with others in the same curricular unit.]